Tag Archives: Space

Jeff Bezos' space company, Blue Origin, to bring hundreds of jobs to Alabama

See how Blue Origin’s new rocket will fly Jeff Bezos is going to build rockets in Alabama. Governor Kay Ivey said on Monday that Blue Origin, Bezos’ private spaceflight company, will build a facility in Huntsvilleto manufacture BE-4 rocket engines. The decision “helps cement Alabama as the preferred destination for the aerospace industry,” Ivey said. The 200,000 square foot plant will create up to 342 new manufacturing jobs. Blue Origin will make about $ 200 million in capital investments in Alabama, according to the Huntsville/Madison County Chamber.Ivey said the new ...

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E3 2017: Multiplayer Shooter “Space Junkies” Coming To VR From Ubisoft

Today during Ubisoft’s E3 briefing, the company officially announced Space Junkies, a new virtual reality game from Ubisoft Montpellier. A jetpack-based shooter, Space Junkies is set in space where you have 360-degree freedom of movement. It supports 1v1 or 2v2 gameplay. The game will be available on Oculus Rift (with Touch controller support) and HTC Vive, and is scheduled to launch in Spring 2018. “Space Junkies is for VR players who are looking for something new and insane and that will get their competitive juices flowing,” Ubisoft Montpellier producer Adrian ...

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This Adorable Little Rocket Just Reached Space for the First Time

Most commercial rockets have a carbo capacity measured in tons, but the new Electron launch vehicle from Rocket Lab is designed for lighter duty. This rocket can haul just 150 kg (331 pounds) into orbit, but it’s cheap and small — really, look how cute and little it is. Rocket Lab is still working out the kinks with the Electron, but it successfully launched the first rocket from its New Zealand facility today. There was no payload and the rocket didn’t quite reach orbit, but the company is still calling ...

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This Week in Space: From Paranal to Proxima B

We won’t know if Proxima b is habitable until we can get some sharp telescopes pointed straight at it, which doesn’t happen until next year. But until then, everyone’s an armchair astronomer, speculating about the little red dot. What if it’s habitable? It lies within the habitable radius around its star. If it has an atmosphere, it could even support life. A team of scientists based in the UK has been running models to see what they can tease out of the data we currently have on Proxima b, and ...

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This Week in Space: the ISS, a Heavy Rocket, and a Dance of Alien Planets

Buzz Aldrin wants NASA to privatize LEO and retire the ISS. At the 2017 Humans to Mars conference, according to Space.com, Aldrin remarked that “We must retire the ISS as soon as possible…We simply cannot afford $ 3.5 billion a year of that cost.” Aldrin’s plan for Mars is heavily dependent on “cyclers,” shuttle orbits between Earth and Mars that could enable the regular transport of cargo and crew between a Mars colony and Earth. But PCMag points out that the ISS is funded through 2024, so Aldrin’s vision isn’t ...

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Mostly NASA, Lightly Salted With a Spy Satellite: This Week in Space

As strange bedfellows go, canning jars and spy satellites don’t seem to have much in common. But Ball Corp. produces both. And one of their spy satellites may have just gone up on a Falcon 9. Mum’s the official NRO word on the launch, which makes sense if the payload is a sensitive one. The FAA launch license claimed a low-Earth orbit. Next up for the Falcon 9 is a May 15 mission to put an Inmarsat communications satellite in orbit. At the end of the month, SpaceX is also ...

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Scientists can now count endangered birds from space

Google Earth gets a facelift Scientists have a new solution for counting endangered birds — using satellite images from space. A team of researchers from the British Antarctic Survey and the Canterbury Museum in New Zealand showed that high-resolution satellite imagery can see albatross birds from space, according to a paper published in the journal “Ibis” on Thursday. Albatrosses— large, mostly white seabirds with wingspans of up to 11 feet — are one of the most threatened groups of birds in the world. They are hard to study, partially because ...

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This Week in Space: Cassini, the James Webb Space Telescope, and Bricks

NASA finally unfurled the James Webb Space Telescope! The JWST has been undergoing acoustic and vibration testing for months, but it’s been fully opened because now it’s time for the next phase of testing. That will take place at the Johnson Space Center in Houston, TX. There, mission techs and scientists will test and calibrate the telescope’s instruments. The James Webb Space Telescope is the scientific successor to the Hubble telescope. Behold here the completely opened telescope mirror in all its glossy, high-tech beauty: Bears a certain resemblance to an ...

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NASA Debuts 3D-Printed Space Chain Mail

When it comes to applied material science, it’s hard to beat NASA. Their solid-state wizards have been working on multiple ambitious projects, including silicon dioxide wafers and about a dozen kinds of ceramic composites. Now some folks at the JPL have debuted a new kind of engineered metallic fabric that they hope will see diverse applications in space — and on other worlds. The new metal fabric is a flexible hybrid of chain mail and plate armor, in the horticultural sense of a hybrid: the offshoot of two different parents, ...

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ESA: Time to Get Serious About Removing Space Junk

Humanity has been shooting things into space for a few decades now, and we’ve gotten pretty good at it. What we haven’t gotten so good at is bringing things back down. Scientists have been sounding the alarm about the buildup of space junk for years, a point that was reinforced at the recent European Conference on Space Debris. The message was clear: we need to stop talking about doing something and actually do it before space gets too crowded. We’ve launched some 7,000 spacecraft as a species since 1957 when ...

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